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The story of Drinking Water Week

Posted May 2, 2016 in Articles

ReWa is celebrating Drinking Water Week because clean water is essential to the people of the Upstate.

But what is Drinking Water Week?

In 1988, American Water Works Association brought the event to the attention of the federal government and formed a coalition along with the League of Women Voters, the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators, and the US Environmental Protection Agency.  It gets better. Willard Scott, the Today Show weatherman, was featured in public service announcements that aired between May 2 and 8. The week-long observance was declared in a joint congressional resolution and signed by President Reagan.

The following year, AWWA approached several organizations to participate. Through these efforts, the National Drinking Water Alliance was formed of 15 nonprofit educational, professional, and public interest organizations. The Alliance dedicated itself to public awareness and involvement in public and private drinking water issues, and continued its work to organize a major annual educational campaign built around Drinking Water Week.

The power of the multi-organization Alliance enabled Drinking Water Week to grow into widespread and committed participation throughout the United States and Canada. In 1991, the Alliance launched a national campaign to inform the public about America’s drinking water. The group distributed a kit containing ideas for celebrating Drinking Water Week, conservation fact and tip sheets, news release and posters. The theme was “There’s a lot more to drinking water than meets the eye.

And now after months of national headlines about contaminated water, we as a community have the opportunity to remember that water is a vital source of life.